About the Nunavik Marine Region Wildlife Board - History

 

The Nunavik Marine Region Wildlife Board (NMRWB) is the agency responsible for the management of wildlife in the Nunavik Marine Region, the offshore area defined by the Nunavik Inuit Land Claims Agreement.  Although the agreement was signed on December 1st, 2006, and in force since July 10th, 2008, the first meeting of the NMRWB did not occur until March 2009.  Since the first meeting, the board has met frequently, and passed numerous resolutions, the most notable of which was the approval of the NMRWB’s first management plan, the 2010 Nunavik and Adjacent Waters Beluga Management Plan.

The board is comprised of seven members – three members appointed by Makivik Corporation, one member appointed by the Federal Minster of Fisheries and Oceans, one member appointed by the Federal Minister of the Environment, one member appointed by the Government of Nunavut, and a chairperson, nominated by the board members and approved by the Federal Minster of Fisheries and Oceans.   Initially, Jean-Guy Beaudoin was nominated as the interim chairperson, but he was replaced when the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans accepted the NMRWB’s nomination of Johnny Oovaut, of Quaqtaq, as the board’s first full-time chairperson in October 2009.

While the NMRWB is the main instrument of wildlife management in the Nunavik Marine Region, it is also considered a co-management board.  This means that the NMRWB is not alone in making management decisions regarding wildlife species in the Nunavik Marine Region.  Some of the co-management partners for the NMRWB include the Canadian Wildlife Service, the Federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and the Nunavut Department of the Environment.  Other partnerships are forged within Nunavik.  The Regional Nunavimmi Umajulivijiit Katujaqatigininga (RNUK, also known as the NHFTA) and the Local Nunavimmi Umajulivijiit Katujaqatigininga (LNUKs) both serve as consultative bodies for the board, allowing news of what is happening at the local, community, and regional levels to be filtered up to the NMRWB.

The NMRWB is also involved in numerous wildlife issues in conjunction with other jurisdictions.  To facilitate and coordinate management decisions for wildlife that occupy, or travel between two or more jurisdictions, such as polar bears, the NMRWB is an active member in groups such as the Polar Bear Administrative Committee, and the National Shrimp Advisory Committee.  The board’s participation in these groups ensures that the voices of Nunavik hunters are heard when making inter-jurisdictional or national wildlife conservation and management decisions.

The NMRWB head-office, where five full-time staff members are currently employed, was established in Inukjuak during the fall of 2009.